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Table of Contents
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 105-106

Change in blood pressure and pulse rate in construction workers working in intense heat


1 Principal, College of Medicine and JNM Hospital, West Bengal University of Health Sciences, Kalyani, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalyani, West Bengal, India

Date of Submission09-Jul-2020
Date of Acceptance16-Jul-2020
Date of Web Publication21-Aug-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ritesh Singh
Department of Community and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Kalyani, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ACCJ.ACCJ_22_20

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How to cite this article:
Mukhopadhyay K, Singh R. Change in blood pressure and pulse rate in construction workers working in intense heat. Ann Clin Cardiol 2020;2:105-6

How to cite this URL:
Mukhopadhyay K, Singh R. Change in blood pressure and pulse rate in construction workers working in intense heat. Ann Clin Cardiol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Nov 27];2:105-6. Available from: http://www.onlineacc.org/text.asp?2020/2/2/105/292969



Sir,

Environmental temperature and human blood pressure (BP) are correlated. Various studies have shown that the BP remains higher in the winter as cold increases sympathetic tone. In the warm temperature, the peripheral blood vessels are dilated, also water and salt are lost in the form of sweating.[1] This causes fall in BP in summer months. The present study was done with the aim of observing the variation of BP in a day in persons involved in vigorous activity. It would ultimately help in managing the hypertensive individuals better by instructing them to take the antihypertensive at a particular time of the day. College of Medicine and JNM Hospital is a medical college situated in Nadia district of the state of West Bengal of India. The college is run by the West Bengal University of Health Sciences. The college started enrolling students for its MBBS course from 2010. Since it is a new medical college, the college is in developmental phase. New buildings are being constructed at the rapid pace. The afternoons become very hot in the summer months. The Tropic of Cancer line passes through the Krishnanagar town which is the district headquarters. The town of Krishnanagar is located at just about 50 km from the medical college. Its geographic location makes the Kalyani town, where the medical college is located, very hot in summers. A new building is coming up besides the academic building of the medical college. Nearly, 20 construction workers work there for at least 8 h a day from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. These workers are involved in the various activities of constructing a building like lifting and carrying heavy eights, grinding of stone chips, and plastering the building, etc. They get a break of half an hour from 11 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. The present study was conducted in those workers. Data were collected from 14 workers who consented to participate in the study. An interview schedule was prepared. The lead author of the paper asked questions from the questionnaire in their native language which was Bengali. The responses were noted. Then, he measured BP and pulse of those 14 participants. The measurements were taken around 8 am following standard guidelines. Later, at around 1 pm, BP and pulse of those participants were measured again. The data were entered in IBM SPSS 22 software (IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 22.0, Armonk, NY: IBM Corp), and analyses were conducted. 7 out of 14 respondents (50%) were illiterate. Only 2 (14.3%) studied till class 10. All of them were regular user of Bidi. 6 (43%) were consuming alcohol also. 2 were addicted to all the three agents, bidi, alcohol, and ganja. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of the respondents was 38.3 (10.9) years. The age range was 22–57 years signifying the wide range of age of workers involved in the construction activities [Table 1]. The mean (SD) pulse rate of the respondents during morning and afternoon hours was 73.5 (9.2) and 96 (7.2) beats/min, respectively. The mean (SD) systolic BP (SBP) of the respondents during morning and afternoon hours were 106.4 (11.5) and 109.8 (10.5) mm of Hg, respectively. The mean (SD) diastolic BP (DBP) of the respondents during morning and afternoon hours were 69.1 (8.4) and 73.2 (7.5) mm of Hg, respectively. Paired “t” test was applied to see the statistically significant difference between the level of pulse, SBP, and DBP during the afternoon and morning hours. The DBP and pulse rate was significantly higher during the afternoon hours with P values of 0.013 and 0.000, respectively [Table 2]. The mean SBP was also raised during afternoon hours compared to morning hours but was not statistically significant (P = 0.145). Many researchers have found out that BP is increased in cooler days. Some studies show that this is not always the case in youths.[2],[3] Similar to our studies, researchers have found out that DBP not SBP changes significantly in those individuals who exercise.[4] In the present studies, the participants are involved in moderate to vigorous intensity of activities for at least a couple of hours in a working day. It is seen that the BP and heart rate increased as the temperature increases.[5],[6] More studies with large sample size 'in' needed to explore the association between the ambient temperature and BP of the young people who are involved in moderate to vigorous physical activity.
Table 1: Description of respondents

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Table 2: Pulse and blood pressure measurements

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Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Rose G. Seasonal variation in blood pressure in man. Nature 1961;189:235.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Brennan PJ, Greenberg G, Miall WE, Thompson SG. Seasonal variation in arterial blood pressure. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982;285:919-23.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Hata T, Ogihara T, Maruyama A, Mikami H, Nakamaru M, Naka T, et al. The seasonal variation of blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension. Clin Exp Hypertens A 1982;4:341-54.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Kristal-Boneh E, Froom P, Harari G, Silber H, Ribak J. Exercise blood pressure changes between seasons. Blood Press Monit 1997;2:223-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Sharma BK, Sagar S, Sood GK, Varma S, Kalra OP. Seasonal variations of arterial blood pressure in normotensive and essential hypertensives. Indian Heart J 1990;42:66-72.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Kochar MS, Ristow S, Kalbfleisch JH. Effect of seasonal temperature change on blood pressure in a treated hypertensive population. J Clin Hypertens 1985;1:49-52.  Back to cited text no. 6
    



 
 
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